QUEEN’S CRESCENT SCHOOL

Reading Policy

Rationale

At Queen’s Crescent School we share a real passion for reading and a love of books. As Educators we know that the development of reading skills is crucial to the progress that children make across the curriculum and we are intent in supporting the children to become confident and effective readers. We have high standards for our readers and expect them to make rapid and sustained progress throughout their time in school.  We do this by setting challenging goals, putting support in place and employing skilled teachers to support the children on their reading journey.

As readers ourselves, we have a common goal. We want the children to share our love of books, to open their minds to a World of imagination and the belief that anything is possible.

We want to allow all of our children to experience the wonderful opportunities that reading gives us. We want them to experience far flung places, ride the seven seas with pirates and find out more about dinosaur bones. We want them to meet King Henry. We want them to explore emotions, experience drama and make sense of their changing World. Reading allows our children to do this.

Reading- Aims and Objectives

At Queen’s Crescent school we aim:

 

  • To encourage both boys and girls, of all levels and abilities to develop a love of reading.
  • To foster an interest in words and their meanings and to gain an appreciation and love of books from a variety of genres
  • To enable children to find books interesting, to read with enjoyment and to evaluate and justify their preferences
  • To enable our children to read confidently, fluently, accurately and with understanding
  • To employ a full range of reading cues- phonic, graphic, syntactic, and contextual- to allow the children monitor, correct and make sense of their own reading.
  • To develop a suitable technical vocabulary through which children may discuss the understanding of their reading
  • To develop reading skills in tandem with those of writing, so that the children may function in society as literate readers for life.
  • To develop and create reading opportunities across the curriculum, to make it meaningful and relevant to the children.
  • To be able to use books confidently and accurately in order to find out about the World and develop deeper understanding.
  • To celebrate the gift of reading and appreciate the rich variety of books, stories and texts we have in school, in libraries, online and at home.

The Early Years Curriculum and The New 2014 National Curriculum

Early Learning Goals for Foundation Stage children are set out in appendix 2. The New National Curriculum has a specific progression for the development of Reading. This is also set out clearly in Appendix 2 and illustrates expectations in Word recognition and Comprehension from Year 1 to Year 6. We plan our reading opportunities based upon the statutory requirements but enhance our teaching of reading further by including a range of exciting and engaging reading experiences.

Approaches to Teaching and learning

 

 Our journey into reading starts with The Oxford Reading Tree scheme. This also includes Project X, Biff and Chip books, Fire flies ( non-fiction texts)  and Treetops. However, we aim to provide the children with a rich diet of reading materials. Our well stocked fiction and non-fiction library ensures the children read a range of quality fiction and non-fiction books from a variety of genres.  in our classrooms our cosy reading corners have big books, comics, diaries, and newspapers. In the FS2 the children are guided in choosing the correct books for their reading level. As the children become more confident they are encouraged to choose their own books, which suit both their interests and reading needs. We also encourage the children to choose non scheme books and short novels to enhance their reading experiences. Our aim is for the children to develop an ownership over the books they choose and to be confident in talking about their reasons for their choices.

In FS2 and key Stage 1 small group guided reading resources include the Rigby Star series and in Key Stage 2 Bug Club is used, including real books and interactive resources.

Strategies for the teaching of Reading

At Queen’s Crescent School reading is taught alongside Letters and Sounds. This initiative promotes a strong and systematic emphasis on the teaching of synthetic phonics to aid the teaching and learning of reading. As part of this scheme the children will be taught to:

  • discriminate between the separate sounds in words;
  • learn the letters and letter combinations most commonly used to spell sounds
  • read words by sounding out and blending their separate parts;
  • study written representations of a sound and how it looks;
  • recognise on sight vocabulary identified as ‘Tricky words’

Reading is taught through Shared Reading sessions, Guided Reading sessions and opportunities to practise and consolidate skills through independent reading. During these sessions, teachers/teaching assistants will use a wide range of strategies to try and enhance the teaching of reading.  Some of these are outlined below:

 

  • modelling and discussing the features of written texts through shared reading of texts;
  • giving direction to develop key strategies in decoding;
  • demonstration - e.g. how to use punctuation when reading, using a shared text;
  • explanation to clarify and discuss e.g. need for grammatical agreement when proof reading;
  • questioning - to probe pupil’s understanding of a text;
  • investigation of ideas - to understand, expand on or generalise about themes and structures in fiction and non-fiction;
  • discussion and argument - to justify a preference;
  • provision of a wide range of fiction and non-fiction genres, for the children to choose from.

We believe that in order for children to foster an enjoyment of reading and in order for them to have an understanding of the texts they read, they must be at the centre of their own learning. Some of the strategies used to enhance this independent learning are outlined below:

 

  • We are aware that all children are individual and have preferred learning styles. Therefore we aim to provide children with a range of visual, kinaesthetic and auditory experiences, which will enhance and improve their reading skills.

 

  • Children will be made aware of/involved in determining the learning focus of the reading session and will have a clear understanding of what the teacher/teaching assistant is looking for in their reading/analysis of the text.

 

  • Children will be given oral and/or written feedback about their reading, in order to help them develop specific aspects of it further, aiding progression.

 

  • Children will be given opportunities to self- assess their own reading. This not only promotes independence, but also assists in their reading development.

 

  • Reading tasks/books will be appropriately matched to individual abilities and needs in the classroom (differentiation).

OPPORTUNITIES FOR READING

There are many opportunities to develop reading skills across the curriculum. Many of the starting points for our termly topics are based upon exciting books. Reading opportunities include:

Shared Reading:

The whole class shares a text, which is beyond their independent reading levels, often using an enlarged text (paper or ICT based). Key Stage 2 teachers will use interactive resources, such as The Bug Club, to regularly teach reading. Whilst Key Stage 1 and FS2 have interactive ORT resources.

Shared reading provides a context for teacher modelling, teaching and applying reading skills (word, sentence and text level).

Individual reading:

As a school we have considered the time constraints imposed when listening to individual readers. Parent helpers and TAs may be timetabled to listen to specific individual children; however the majority of children will be listened to through targeted discussion and guided reading.

Guided Reading:

Guided Reading takes place in a small group, with a teacher or teaching assistant, and focuses on developing children’s ability to become independent readers, thinkers and learners.  The key skills which are developed through guided reading is the development of comprehension through discussion and pertinent questioning. These sessions also allow the children to develop a greater depth of understanding in the reading. The children are grouped by ability and read individual copies of the same text, which challenges and extends the group.

Adults reading aloud:

Whenever possible all class teachers will read aloud a range of stories and texts to the classes. We believe that giving children the opportunity to hear an adult read aloud, allows them to comment on and make sense of the events and experiences within a text. These sessions also allow the teachers to deepen a child’s understanding, by asking literal and inferential questions. Most importantly however, storytime allows our teachers to share their passion for reading.  We do it for our own enjoyment and because we recognise how precious story time is in our classes.

Cross curricular:

We actively encourage the children to become fully involved with their learning and encourage them to read a range of topic books which will support their work across the curriculum. Our non fiction library is well resourced with a wide range of topics and the children are encouraged to use it on a daily basis, using the Dewey system.

Enrichment activities:

We regularly enrich our reading experiences by providing opportunities for visitors to come to our school to share stories. This may be through assemblies, an author focus or book week. The children are encouraged to read books from various authors and discuss the styles in which they write and the themes within their books. The children love dressing as their favourite book characters and we always celebrate Book week. Whilst we hold regular after school reading events, such as books at bedtime, The Reading Festival is an evening extravaganza when children and their families are invited to join in with storytelling workshops and reading themed activities.  This has proved most successful in recent years, with support from authors, storytellers, The Wiltshire Scrapstore and local Secondary Schools.

We enjoy a strong partnership with Chippenham library who regularly visit our school for assemblies and to promote the Summer Reading Challenge.

Lunchtime reading buddies regularly share books with our younger children in the playground. In addition to this, a weekly story telling club is held to engage our FS2 readers and a community lending library is well established at the entrance to the school, allowing all members of our school community to borrow or donate a book regularly.

Parents as Partners

We firmly believe that parents who share the same passion and vision for reading make an enormous impact on their children’s progress and enjoyment. We really value the encouragement and support that our parents give when their child is reading at home.  Communication is vital and we encouraged parents to make a written comment in the school reading record, to show how their child has demonstrated understanding, fluency and enjoyment when reading to them.  This reinforces to the children how important it is to read regularly at home and at school. It also allows them to experience the pleasure of reading with an adult or parent and share special moments together.

To support our parents further, we offer an after school parent and child library club, which encourages families to read together.  All parents are invited to attend workshops at school to help them gain a better understanding of how they may help their child reading at home. A booklet to support parents is available to download from the school’s website.

Home/School Reading:

All children are encouraged to borrow books from class collections, and read these at home and in school during independent reading time.  The children take home  colour-coded reading books, which are suitable for their reading ability (in FS2 and KS1 these books mostly focus on the Oxford Reading Scheme).

 From Year 1 readers are encouraged to choose their own books from their colour band (appendix 1) and they record the titles of the books they read. When the children are more confident they are able to choose between scheme books and other books, in order to broaden their diet and have opportunities to widen their vocabulary and imagination.

Resources

We are  fortunate to have range of quality resources to support the development and love of reading.

We regularly ensure:

 

  • Our library is kept up to date with new books being stocked to reflect current interest and needs, including scheme and real books.

 

  • A range of visual, auditory and kinaesthetic resources are used in the teaching of reading to ensure all learning styles of the children are being addressed.

 

  • A range of ICT software is available for the children to use to help them improve their reading skills, including Bug Club, I-pad apps and the VLE resources.

 

  • Spagpuss  boards and visual word banks will be regularly updated to support the children with their reading, writing and spelling

 

  • Our teachers and teaching assistants are well trained in teaching reading and phonics and that high standards are maintained

 

  • That the New 2014 National Curriculum requirements are shared and that teachers are well resourced and equipped to teach reading successfully

 

  • That all adults and children are given the opportunity to read for pleasure

SEND/EAL

All children have the right to develop a love of reading and to access a range of books for pleasure.

Those children with English as a second language or have IEPs with related reading targets may have specific additional activities which will aid the development of their reading. IEPs with SMART targets will identify the steps in place to make further progress. These individual children may be given additional one to one reading sessions and TA led reading activities. Likewise booster sessions may be given to extend and challenge the most able of readers in KS2. Reading Rainbows supports targeted Year 1 and 2 children.  Regular reading sessions by trained adults, including TAs and parent volunteers (Reading Rockets and Better Readers) takes place for a fixed period with individual children. These adults have undergone specific training with the Reading Interventions Teacher and are trained on how to assess and support the children’s reading. 

Reading Rainbows/  Reading Rockets/ Better Reading Partners/ Peer Reading Buddies

 

  • Reading Rainbows is delivered by a Reading Intervention Teaching Assistant. Children between the ages of 5.9years and 6.3 years are carefully selected using the Observational Survey assessment. The specialist uses knowledge gained from Reading training and CPD to devise individual learning programmes for a cohort of 4 children. Children work on the programme 1:1 for up to 20 weeks by which time their reading should have reached an age appropriate level.

 

  • Reading Rockets is a teacher delivered intervention overseen by a Reading Specialist Teacher. Children identified as vulnerable to underachievement in Years 1 and 2 work in small groups for 20 minute sessions once or twice a week to develop and practise a range of decoding strategies as well as the skills needed for fluency, comprehension and enjoyment.

 

  • TAs, parent helpers and governors receive training and CPD from our Reading Specialist Teacher Leader. These adults work with children who are attaining just below age appropriate levels. Children are identified by team leaders and work 1:1 with their adult partner for 15 minutes three times a week for ten weeks.

 

  • Peer Reading Buddies are children from years 4-6 who receive training from the Reading Specialist Teacher. They aim to read daily with a Key Stage 1 or FS2 child promoting independence, confidence and enjoyment.

Equal Opportunities

All children will have an equal opportunity to work within this policy area. Account will be taken of specific needs and where appropriate support will be accessed through the special needs policy.

Curriculum Links

This policy is supported by the range of whole school policies, including assessment, SEN, Handwriting, Spelling and writing policies.

Assessment

Assessments are carried out through teacher set tasks, focused observations, questioning of the children, The children’s reading development will be evaluated on an ongoing basis by the teacher/ teaching assistant and/or child, which ultimately informs the planning of reading. 2014 NC grids  will be used to inform planning and the children’s attainment will be updated regularly on the school tracker.

The English leader will monitor and evaluate the teaching and learning of reading on a regular basis across school, to ensure continuity and progress is evident .Oral and/or written targets, using the 2014 grids as a guide, will be set by the teacher and/or child to help children achieve their full potential in reading. In Year 1 the children will take part in the Phonics screening in the Summer term.  In Year 2 and Year 6 the children will take a formal reading assessment as part of SATs and in Key Stage 2 all children will be assessed through Optional SATs testing. 

NFER reading papers will indicate reading ages and will be taken in term 2 and term 6 from Year 2 up to Year 6.

Staff  will regularly inform parents of the children’s reading progress by writing in their home/school record books, at parents’ evenings and through the annual reports of children’s progress in reading.

Roles and responsibilities

This policy has been developed through consultation with staff, subject leaders, head teacher and governing body. The Head teacher, Senior Leadership team and subject leaders will monitor and evaluate the work achieved. The leaders will identify areas for development, resource needs and moderate standards across the school.

Monitoring and Evaluation

The monitoring and evaluation of the achievements made in this area of the curriculum is carried out through the guidelines on monitoring and evaluation. These set out how the Head teacher, SLT, subject leader use a range of strategies to assess the qualities of achievements. The class teachers, however, have a key role in monitoring and evaluating the teaching and learning taking place in their class.

The subject leaders will regularly review the reading action plan and will work with the SMT to evaluate any relevant areas of the School development plan when appropriate. The leaders will also liaise with the link Governor and will attend meetings to keep the Governing Body informed and updated.

The periodic reports of SIA and Ofsted will give independent views on the standards achieved within this subject area.

 

Appendix 1  Reading Levels-This is an approximate guide for levels and reading ages. Teachers will also have to take into account key word recognition, comprehension skills and Letters and Sound stages when considering the level of the children’s reading books. From Orange ORT level the children are encouraged to choose short novel real books ( turquoise stickers) to supplement their reading diet.

Colour

        STAGE

Approximate Reading levels

Grey

ORT 1

 (RA below 3.6-4.6 yrs)  Expected range- FS2

Purple

ORT 1+

 ( RA 4.6-5yrs)

Green

ORT 2

 (RA 4.6-5 yrs)

Blue

ORT 3

 (RA approx  5-5.6 yrs) Expected range- Year 1

Red

ORT 4

 (RA approx 5 -5.6yrs)

Yellow

ORT 5

 (RA approx 5.6-6 yrs)

Orange

ORT 6

 (RA approx 6 -6.6yrs) Expected range- Year 2

Dark Pink

ORT 7

 (RA approx 6.6-7 yrs)

Brown

ORT 8

 (RA approx 7-7.6 yrs)

Black

ORT 9

 (RA approx 7.6-8 yrs)

Cream

     ORT 10

 (RA approx 8 -8.6yrs) Expected range-Year 3

Cerise

ORT 11 Treetops

(RA approx 8.6 yrs-9 yrs)

Cerise

ORT 12

ORT 12 + Treetops

(RA approx 9-9.6 yrs)

Expected range- Year 4

Cerise

ORT 13 13+ Treetops

(RA approx 9.6-10yrs)

Cerise

ORT 14 Tree tops

(RA approx 10-10.6yrs) Expected range- Year 5

Light Blue

ORT 15 & 16 Treetops

(RA approx 11 yrs +)  Expected range- Year 6

Red

Fiction choice

 (RA approx 11 yrs +)

Dark Blue

Fiction Choice

(RA approx 11 yrs +)  Year 6 only

Appendix 2

 

Early Learning Goals for Reading

Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

New 2014 National Curriculum

Year 1

Word recognition

Pupils should be taught to:

  • apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words
  • respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes
  • read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught
  • read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings
  • read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs
  • read words with contractions [for example, I’m, I’ll, we’ll], and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s)
  • read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words

re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

Comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
  • listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently
  • being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences
  • becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics
  • recognising and joining in with predictable phrases
  • learning to appreciate rhymes and poems, and to recite some by heart
  • discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known
  • understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by:
  • drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
  • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
  • discussing the significance of the title and events
  • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
  • predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say

explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

Year 2

Word Recognition

Pupils should be taught to:

  • continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent
  • read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes
  • read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above
  • read words containing common suffixes
  • read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered
  • read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation

re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

Comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
  • listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently
  • discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related
  • becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
  • being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways
  • recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
  • discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary
  • discussing their favourite words and phrases
  • continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
  • understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by:
  • drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
  • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
  • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
  • answering and asking questions
  • predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say

explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

Year 3 and 4

Word recognition

Pupils should be taught to:

  • apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet

read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.

Reading comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
  • listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
  • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally
  • identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
  • discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
  • recognising some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry]
  • understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:
  • checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context
  • asking questions to improve their understanding of a text
  • drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
  • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
  • identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
  • retrieve and record information from non-fiction

participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Year 5/6

Word recognition

Pupils should be taught to:

apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

Reading Comprehension

Pupils should be taught to:

  • maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
  • continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices
  • identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • making comparisons within and across books
  • learning a wider range of poetry by heart
  • preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience
  • understand what they read by:
  • checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context
  • asking questions to improve their understanding
  • drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
  • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas
  • identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader
  • distinguish between statements of fact and opinion
  • retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction
  • participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously
  • explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary

provide reasoned justifications for their views.